Aashiqui 2: Inebriated Aberration

IIFL Rating: 1/5

The Bhatt camp is indeed lucky to have amassed a nice kitty, dishing out a wayward rehash in the name of a sequel. The gloss is impressive but devoid of sensible content, the package numbs your senses beyond repair.

Sudhir Raikar / 10:36, 07-May-13

When Rahul Roy and Anu Agarwal became overnight stars with Aashiqui, we knew the catchy Kumar Sanu – Anuradha Poudwal compositions had played a pivotal role in their success.  Aditya Roy Kapoor and Shraddha Kapoor of Aashiqui 2 are much better artistes in comparison but most unfairly have to cope with an average score and a mindless story.  And yet, they churn out a super hit. Attribute the achievement to the pair’s chemistry or feel sorry for our falling standards of film viewing, we are not sure.

The hero Rahul Jayakar is a nervous wreck, a gaudy carbon copy of Ranbir the Rockstar. He blows his top by the minute and swears only by neat drinks, we never know why. Thanks to his dwindling fame, he’s now invited to ‘anjaan’ small towns (Goa and little known, no way) where he picks up fights midway, abandons his audience only to scout for some alcohol in the wee hours. And then suddenly, he bumps into the heroine Aarohi Keshav Shirke, carrying vegetables past midnight and later singing his numbers in a shady bar. She looks adoringly at Lata Mangeshkar, he looks attentively at her. And the rest is predicable history. He wants her to be India’s greatest singing sensation; she wants to become the same. He loves her, she loves her too. But when things are finally hunky dory, the hero is strangely inflicted with the “Abhiman” syndrome. Now he suddenly aspires to regain his lost paradise.

But the alcohol has burnt his ‘gale ke taar’, you see. (it should have done more given the intake) So, he’s denied a comeback. How sad! Worse, it takes a trivial conversation between two drunkards in a seedy bar to convince him that he’s now destined to abuse his relationship with the heroine. She’ll rot all her life as his keep, caretaker and nurse. After some funny twists and turns, he ends his life to save her from all the trouble. And all this while, his visibly caring, New York-based dad is only a phone call away but can’t do anything – not even to save his son’s life, forget preventing the embarrassment of declined credit cards.  

Honestly, the ridiculous sequel was tailor made for the ridiculous pair of the wooden Rahul Roy and the greasy Anu Agarwal. Aditya and Shraddha truly deserved the musical score of the original, if not anything else.