Tropical storm ‘Doksuri’ drags southwesterly flows to west coast, interiors dry

Global forecasts indicate that ‘Doksuri’ would make a landfall on the southeast coast of China within the next two days.

Jun 28, 2012 12:06 IST India Infoline News Service

Tropical storm ‘Doksuri’ in the northwest Pacific has caused southwesterly flows to hit the west coast yet again.

The offshore trough extended this morning from Konkan to Kerala, which is causing the flows to drop most of its moisture along the west coast, but hardly any in adjoining interior.

Some of the flows are being directed into Bay of Bengal as well, but there has been no progress in the movement of the northern limit of the monsoon.

Global forecasts indicate that ‘Doksuri’ would make a landfall on the southeast coast of China within the next two days.

Forecasts also indicate the possibility of the formation of low-pressure areas both over the Bay of Bengal and northeast Arabian Sea where they would set up a wet session across the peninsula and adjoining central India into the first week of July.

But the forecasts do not suggest if the rains would march into the plains of east India and northwest India.

In India, where agriculture and farming account for 15% of the $2tn economy, timely and sufficient rainfall is extremely crucial as 55% of the arable land depends on rains for water needs. The four month long monsoon season lasts from June to September.


On Jun 5, rains had reached the mainland in southern Kerala, four days later than normal, according to the India Meteorological Department (IMD).


Weather officials said a cyclonic pressure over the Arabian Sea has delayed the rains, plus or minus 4 days, from its expected June 1 arrival date, reports added.

According to IMD data, rainfall in the country was 23% below average till Jun 27.

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